Exxon Oil Spill Louisiana National Refuge

May 16, 2012

THE STORY:

 

Exxon’s pipeline that originates in St. James Louisiana has broken and has spilled into the Atchafalaya refuge. Exxon has shut down the pipeline that originates in St. James Louisiana.
 
 
OUR CONCERN:
 
We cannot sustain anymore spills – most critically in Louisiana.
 
 
THE PLAYERS: 
 
 
Exxon, BP who continues to have disasters in the Gulf and continues to use Corexit when there are proven alternatives that are non toxic.
 
Secretary of the Interior, Ken Salazar and Minerals Management – a branch of the interior (who I believe, oversees who gets the mineral rights to drill) have completely disregarded mammal protection laws.
 
This list is extensive and will be accessed as needed.
 
 
 
ALTERNATIVES DISREGARDED
 
Many alternatives were offered during the BP oil spill – many looked at, none chosen.
 
One particular boom would have collected significantly more oil and is currently used in Russia. 
 
Steven Pedigo of OSE ll, has a non toxic, cost effective bio remediation process to remove oil which was endorsed by a top executive from BP –  but still the oil companies will not use it.

PROMISES MADE:

BP promised our team 13 million for remediation. Our suit was dropped after their claims dept suggested the process would move faster if we did this. We have seen nothing else from BP and the oil is still in the marsh.

 

Exxon invented Corexit and this is and was the primary chemical used in the cleanup.

 

 

TEAM MEMBERS AFFECTED:

 

Example: Team member, Michael Boatwright, a coral expert who works in hatcheries, is dealing with extensive skin burns on his body from his extended exposure to the chemicals in Corexit. THE NEW SPILL:

  Another oil spill occurred Saturday in Torbert Louisiana next to the Atchafalaya refuge. We are not sure who authorized a pipeline next to a national refuge but we are working to find out. Last week I made contact with the Corp of Army Engineers Deputy Inspector and two star general, as I believe there I will find my answer.

This oil spill dredges up the anguish from the recent BP Oil SPill. Lamar McKay, president of BP North America, had asked Darryl Willis, head geologist, to contact me and secure funding for my team to rescue sea turtles and other wildlife during the BP oil spill. We gathered a field of experts and flew into Louisiana. What we witnessed will live in our minds forever. We documented oiled wildlife and oil seeping into the most pristine beautiful marshes in the world.

We have comprised a group of people that are experts in environmental hazards and remediation and want to expose what his happening in the marshlands of Louisiana. This group of experts includes people that care about the environment and want to expose what is happening to the earth. U.S. Animal Protection, Gulf Wildlife Rescue, Gulf Recovery LLC, Sea Turtle Restoration Project, Ocean Defenders, Phillipe Cousteau, and many more people came into Louisiana to help with the BP Oil Spill- most were turned away leaving oiled animals and grasslands to die. It was not like the Valdez where everyone came in to clean animals. BP wanted to keep these pictures out of the mainstream. They could not do this if they allowed people to come in an clean and rescue these animals.

 
There was a very small operation hired on by BP called O’Briens. O’Briends hired Rhonda Mergatroid who was  the main person left in charge to carry out the largest wildlife rescue in Louisiana history. Even the Audubon Zoo rescue team wasn’t allowed in! The zoo was only allowed to take animals in. Many of the team wanted to rescue but was held back when many more animals could have been saved this way.

Ms. Mergatroid trained under Sharon Shmalz with Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation,  who was more than qualified and worked many oil spills who was ready to begin cleanup and rescue although would never be cleared to do so.  O’Brien chose only Mergatroid who everyone reported to including both Veterinarians on location.  Fish and Wildlife left their stations when it hit 97degrees- this was nearly every day. The stations were set up but no animals in them, we have photos. This group is forming together again to expose the Exxon Spill and the fact that this new spill is near a national refuge must be addressed immediately. The chemicals used after a spill is causing even more damage than the spill itself.

 
Why is Exxon allowed to use a known cancer causing toxic agent and able to profit by being the only firm contractually to use Corexit and why are pipelines being built through or alongside national refuges?
 
THESE QUESTIONS DEMAND AN ANSWER

Dawn Taylor
U.S.A.P.

United States Animal Protection TN Pit Bull Rings

March 8, 2012

United States Animal Protection working in Tennessee to stop the horrific abuse inflicted on pit bulls and arrest of those who are fighting them.

U.S. Animal Protection (U.S.A.P.) headquartered in New Orleans, LA, began investigating dog fighting in Tennessee in 2006 after local animal rescuers reported missing pit bulls from the Trenton, TN animal shelter. U.S.A.P. President & Founder Dawn Taylor, (former lead cruelty investigator, TN- SPCA) reached out to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation (TBI) and was lucky enough to find an individual that truly cared about animals and agreed to look into allegations against Gibson County, TN mayor Riley and an ACO (animal control officer) stealing and selling pit bulls. We were able to obtain an audio recording of ACO Red Williams agreeing to sell pit bulls to the undercover TBI agent. It was then discovered that the mayor and ACO Williams had fought, tortured and killed pit bulls stolen from the shelter. Many of these animals were put in incinerators alive. Screams were heard by a local rescuer that happened to walk up on the shelter while Red Williams was killing said animals. On going investigations revealed that scores of pitbull fighters reside in this area.

Our ongoing investigations brought U.S.A.P. to 2010 when a witness contacted us describing a horrific case of cruelty. Many pit bulls had been poisoned with rat poison. Dogs of all ages were found dead while others lay dying for several days as the dogs’ “owner”, later described. The owner later became an informant for U.S.A.P. The TBI again was notified and is fervently continuing this investigation with the lead of U.S.A.P.

After months of investigating, Ms. Taylor was able to obtain the names of the main pit bull fighters throughout the region. Audio tapes were made of local pit bull fighters, with the consent and assistance of informant Jarrett xxxxxx Also, tapes were made to document names and information about illegal activities concerning upcoming dog fights. This information was shared with sister organization Rescued Unwanted Furry Friends Foundation ( R.U.F.F.F.) President & Founder Hillarie Allison , headquartered in Arizona as well as U.S.A.P. Vice-President, and Robert Misseri, a trusted animal activist and Guardians of Rescue founder (previously of Rescue Ink) in New York. Mr. Misseri then alerted Chris Derose of Last Chance for Animals to the case U.S.A.P. had initiated many months before.

U.S.A.P. did not relinquish the case but welcomed Mr. Derose, who joined in the investigation. U.S.A.P. in conjunction with the TBI, discovered that plans were in place for a “Bash” ( a huge fight involving hundreds of dogs) in September 2011. Top U.S.A.P. members waited anxiously for the “Bash” that the dog fighters hold annually to enact the bust. This illegal bash is attended by many, including well-known sports figures and famous celebrities and is a major gambling event. Unfortunately, our informant was arrested on unrelated charges before the “bash” occurred and no arrests have been made to date. It is estimated 500+ pit bulls are being fought in the localized area of Gibson County, TN and surrounding areas. U.S.A.P is working with filmmakers to document the dog fighting rings that will ultimately culminate in arrests and convictions. U.S.A.P. members are hopeful that this documentation will prove invaluable if caught on film. To get an arrest in Tennessee,the perpetrators generally have to be caught in the act. Often, the case gets thrown out or minimized to a slap on the wrist! It is our goal to see that this doesn’t happen again and that these dog fighting monsters get sentenced to the full extent of the law. While we continue our work on this case we will be attempting to gather footage of pit bull fighters in action. Our informant has agreed to meet us in Tennessee as we send in our own filmmakers to gather evidence of these atrocities and facilitate the arrest and conviction of these unconscionable pit bull fighters. The lead animal cruelty investigator in TN has agreed to take in the dogs after seizure as well as a local humane society. The dogs will first be placed in a “Triage” setting to assess their condition and health.The dogs will be removed safely and placed into the hands of respected animal rescuers. President Taylor along with other members of U.S.A.P. will then bring in local volunteer vets to treat any conditions or injuries prior to transporting to the above mentioned facilities, with the ultimate goal of finding adoptive homes for any and all that are deemed adoptable. The others will be sent to sanctuaries to be rehabilitated and /or live out their natural lives in loving peace.

U.S.A.P. will not rest until these perpetrators are exposed and brought to justice!

My name is Ken xxxxxx and I’m currently a Special Agent with the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation. I am writing you regarding Dawn Taylor Bechtold. Dawn has brought awareness to the TBI concerning dog fighting and animal cruelty inside Tennessee’s borders. As a result of Dawn’s efforts, several individuals involved in animal fighting, animal cruelty, and drug trafficking were arrested and are currently being prosecuted at this time. Our office is committed to combating animal cruelty and will continue to work with Dawn in anyway we can. Dawn is described as passionate and relentless when it comes to protecting and saving the lives of helpless animals.

Thank you for your consideration,

Ken xxxxx, Special Agent TBI

Note; we are not finished in TN filmakers have come in and put the rest of this investigation at risk. We are trying to repair the damage with our informant so that more arrest will eventually be made by the TBI. All of our thanks to the TBI for the arrest made.

United States Animal Protection BP Animals Left to Die USAP Documents BP Oil Spill

January 15, 2012

 


             

                     USAP-GWRU Proposal

                Wildlife Rescue

                Confidential

            By

                 Dawn Taylor Bechtold

               

                                                                                                                                  Allen E. Walker    

                                    


                             

                  

        

 

                      Proposal to O’BriensRM,  BP – Coast Guard

     The proposal of USAP-GWRU is to assist in the Gulf wildlife rescue as well as assist BP with public relations. We believe at USAP-GWRU that the local captains are capable of enhancing wildlife rescue through BP’s “Vessels of Opportunity” By BP assisting the captains in nursing the own waters back to health and helping them provide for their families during these trying times would be pinnacle to the future relations of both parties.

USAP-GWRU have assembled a team of animal rescuers and rehabilitators that are ready to deploy now. We at USAP-GWRU would like to lead the efforts of animal rescue by stationing our groups and triage at all marinas USAP-GWRU also has the backing of public, science and industry to put our plan into motion.

USAP-GWRU also has the backing of all United States Coast Guard qualified captains in the immediate area that include captains that have environmental degrees to help oversee and advise their fellow captains in each marina across the state of Louisiana.

 It is widely known that BP’s VOO can use some assistance in bettering their program to the benefit of BP, the captains and wildlife. USAP and GWRU have drawn up a provisional temporary emergency order to allow captains to by-pass regulations that have kept them from saving wildlife. The local captains are by far the most capable in assisting BP in this venture. Charter captains have always picked up injured wildlife, until the oil spill disaster.  Oiled animals are being seen in large numbers and in many cases there is no time to call the 800 lines set up to capture wildlife.

We are recommending that BP add GWRU to their vessels of opportunity program. We are also recommending that BP add USAP to the program for rehabilitation and rescue of the wildlife. This will enhance the VOO dramatically.

                                         Objectives

1) Assist with public relations

2) Assist with future relations of captains and their families.

3) Assist in putting more people to work through the VOO.

4) Assist in the wildlife rescue

                                

 The captains will work under VOO through BP’s established rules and regulations. For example their will be no video, no photos and no interviews with the media without the consent of BP.  The captains have already built bonding relations with the coast guard and BP both parties agree this is important.

 

USAP in the gulf documenting oil and oiled wildlife by longitude/latitude. Team members are all qualified to rescue and include sea turtle doctors, marine biologist, environmental scientist and boat captains.

 Rescuers frustration grows as many qualified individuals are not being cleared to rescue. Similar to Katrina one entity controls most of the rescue. If you are caught rescuing you will be arrested. No trawling is going on in the gulf or triage we have seen in the marshlands.  USAP will address this in an NBC interview over the weekend.

We have been all over the gulf by land and by sea and not once have we seen any rescue of animals and only one triage unit at around 4:30 but no one at the unit. Rescue is nothing short of minimal. We were told by Fish and Wildlife if temps hit 94 degrees they pull out.

We have been in the gulf for 12 weeks. Expenditures are at around 40,000. Lodging is at around 3000.00 per month. Lodging for other rescuers was provided as well as truck rental, boats and fuel. We have accessed the gulf from Venice to Grand Isle by boat and by plane. We have been told we are cleared but have nothing in writing and are still waiting. We have viewed oiled birds on Queen Bess Island, and Dolphins swimming in oil. Our team has a method of rescuing that can rescue as many turtles in a day as are being rescue in one month.

This week we hope to begin rescue but at this time the hurricane is due to hit on Sunday morning and many are evacuating the area.

Frustration growing in the gulf with other rescuers not being allowed to rescue.

United States Animal Protection and Gulf Wildlife Rescue Unit work together to find solutions and have formed an alliance of people that can cover every need in the Gulf Coast from animal rescue to environmental remediation.

This team saw a need to cover all areas of protection of animals that included not only rescue of animals but protecting the gulf and wetlands which are the migratory pass and nesting grounds for all species of wildlife.

 Al Walker and Dawn Taylor Bechtold have worked tirelessly to form the team of people that can make this happen.  The have traveled the Louisiana coast line to find the brilliant people behind solutions to helping wildlife in peril as well as remedies for our waters and precious wetlands.

We are proud to announce the union of U.S. Animal Protection and Gulf Wildlife Rescue Unit.

Our expert panel includes; Dawn Taylor Bechtold Director of Gulf Wildlife Rescue and President of U.S. Animal Protection, Captain, Al Walker, scuba diver and underwater photographer, Christopher Pincetich, Ph.D and marine biologist, Steven Kolian environmental scientist,Scott Porter marine biologist, of Eco Rigs, Sharon Shmalz oiled wildlife rescue and trainer with 60 oil spill rescuers under her belt, as well as aqua cultural/ recirc system specialist Michael Boatwright and,Gary Reynolds who hold a proprietary non toxic formula to remove oil covered animals and directors Anna Grace Keller and Joy Tessman National Geographic,  this team will make lasting positive change in the Gulf Coast Region.

    This team will fight to save our wildlife and wetlands.

 God bless America and help us through this terrible tragedy.

 

ODA visit to the Gulf Oil Disaster (~10mins) by Kurt Lieber on Vimeo. USAP helped fund this project by providing lodging, food and transportation to and from several airports.

  references; Ms. Lauren Stover who worked with USAP during Katrina and Rita, under the Admiral Allen administration  as well as Mr. Kim Estes BP and Mr. Darryl Willis BP

United States Animal Protecton Humane Sheltering Standards

January 15, 2012

Recommendations for Humane Sheltering Standards

1. Animals entering shelters and rescue

Humane sheltering protocol should always consider the animals health, safety, and administration of drugs when shelter animals must be euthanized.

Every consideration should be given to each individual life. When an animal can be adopted or accepted by rescue the animal should be released to a properly licensed rescue or acceptable home. Every breed of animal should be given consideration for rescue.

2. adequate food source and health condition of animals.

Upon entering the shelter the animal condition should be evaluated and a determination should be made if veterinarians services are required or if the animal is too sick or injured and should be euthanized. Every animals condition should be documented and photographed and entered into a ledger and filed by date.

The animals entering the shelter should be given food and water and an amount that is sufficient to that animals health and well being.

Food chart for Dogs

Weight of Dog (lbs)

Suggested Daily Amount

3 TO 10

1/4 TO 2/3 Cup

10 TO 20

2/3 TO 1 Cup

20 TO 30

1 TO 1 1/2 Cups

30 TO 40

1 1/2 TO 1 3/4 Cups

40 TO 60

1 3/4 TO 2 1/2 Cups

60 TO 80

2 1/2 TO 3 Cups

80 TO 100

3 TO 3 1/2 Cups

> 100

3 1/2 Cups +

Food chart for cats

Weight of Cat (lbs)

Suggested Daily Amount

3 TO 6

1/4 TO 1/3 Cup

7 TO 12

1/3 TO 1/2 Cup

13 TO 18

1/2 TO 3/4 Cup

3. Records, intake, outgoing, rescue and adoptions.

Intake out take records should be kept of every animal especially breeds that can be sold illegally by shelter employees. For example; pure bred unaltered animals sold for breeding purposes, animals for fighting purposes or bait dogs or surplus animals to class b dealers.

Photo documentation of every animal entering and leaving the facility with the adopter or rescuer should be kept in records. The shelter staff should submit pictures of animals entering the shelter to the shelters web site. Every animal should be entered into PetFinder.

Addresses of adopters and rescuers should be kept where the animal will reside.

Municipal shelters are tax run facilities and consideration of tax payers concerned for animals should be held into account and shelter staff should allow volunteers to assist with care of animals held in the shelter.

4. Release of animals from shelters, spay and neuter of animals.

Upon release of animals an agreement must be signed to adopter. Animals must be transported from shelter to veterinarians office for spay or neuter before the animal is released to new guardian. Records should be kept of adoptions and fees which will be applied to cost of surgery.

5. Vaccinations, sick animals, rescue alerts and, humane euthanasia for sick or injured animals.

Vaccinations should be given to healthy animals upon entering the shelter and sick animals should be separated from the healthy. Injured or sick animals should be evaluated by specialist that can determine if the animals is suffering from an mortal injury or imminent death and it should be determined if the animal should be euthanized immediately to end suffering. If an animal is taken in that is injured or sick, rescue groups should be alerted and given the option to vet the animal.

6. Stopping the spread of disease throughout the shelter.

Floors should be sealed, cement floors are porous and harbor bacteria. Proper sanitary conditions should be kept in each pen. Animals should be removed from pens while cleaning. It should be required animals are kept off cold floors, especially nursing mothers. Tundra beds are recommended.

7. Temperatures of shelters and transport vehicles and capture of animals.

Shelter temperatures and shelter transport vehicle temperatures should be at a level so as to maintain optimal health and comfort and prevent death from heat exhaustion or freezing. When an animal cannot be captured the animals should be tranquilized with a non lethal method. Gun shot should not be used to kill an animal that cannot be captured. All humane methods of capture should be used. Catch poles should be used with care so as not to injure the animal.

8. Animal Shelter Employees

Animal shelter employees back grounds should be checked and have no animal cruelty convictions against them.

Animals shelter staff should be offered a questionnaire that will show level of concern of animals. Shelter staff should be hired that display compassion for animals.

9. Hold time of animals and owner turn-ins

Animals should be held the recommended time by state and if room is left in the shelter animals should be held and rescue contacted. Every possible resource should be used to save the animal. Owner turn-ins should not be immediately killed and released to rescue if rescue is available.

10. Records and euthanasia

Records of scheduled II narcotics is mandatory and is expected from every shelter in the United States. The drugs used to anesthetize or euthanize must not be left out for the public and two staff members should be involved when removing the drugs from a locked cabinet. Conditions where animals are euthanized should be kept sanitary with adequate equipment to ensure a humane disposition of the animal.

When euthanizing by inter Peritoneal and administering only 1 to 2 ccs of sodium pentobarbital per 10 lbs of body weight this would be less than the required dosage and should be declared an insufficient amount of sodium pentobarbital to cause death. Intercardiac (IC injection) heartstick is not recommended as a method of euthanasia by shelter staff. Repeated problems of occurred by shelter employees when using this method. When IC is administered by a veterinarian the animal should be comatose. Gassing, shooting and killing by blunt force trauma is a method that should never be used to control population of animals and is considered cruel.

IV is considered the most humane way to euthanize and if an animal will be killed in any particular shelter or facility IV is the acceptable procedure. Scales should be used to determine weight of animals before euthanizing an animal.

The Sternberg method of testing animals should not be used to determine the death of an animal. The Sternberg test is not reliable and should not be the determining factor of whether an animal should live or die. Fear in animals should be considered and ample time should be given to the animals to become acclimated in a calm environment before considering death.

Letter from U.S. Animal Protection to Walker County and all Animal Shelters.

Animals when euthanized improperly suffer extremely horrible deaths. We at United States Animal Protection want all animals that enter shelters to be given every available resource to be rescued or adopted.

Mass killing and releasing animals to laboratories that may be lost, abandoned or given up by the uncaring public to laboratories should never be an option and it contradicts what the majority of the American public want for animals that enter municipal shelters.

Pound Seizure and Mass killing represents the antithesis of what a shelters purpose is and what is deemed acceptable or humane. Rescue and adoption should be the fist option and when necessary euthanasia should be what is considered humane. I speak for all rescuers and activist, we that have consideration and compassion for animals suffer the deepest depths of despair along with the animals and hear their cries for help. Please join us now and treat all animals with the dignity and respect they deserve in life and in death.

Dawn Taylor-Bechtold

President and Founder

United States Animal Protection

866-455-USAP

http://www.USAnimalProtection.org

United States Animal Protection work to end inhumane killings

January 15, 2012
  1. UGA law credited for article

    USAP Press Release by Reagan

    Filed under: SALDF | Tags: , , , ,
    The Official Press Release from United States Animal Protection, Inc.:
    1
    Thousands of Animals Were Dragged to Their Deaths and Suffocated in this Gas Chamber. This Will End Forever July 1st.
    Please call the county manager and ask this chamber be disassembled and removed immediately.
    Please ask them to confirm when this gas chamber is sent to the landfill and destroyed.
    We do not want another animal to ever suffer in this chamber. It is time a spay/neuter ordinance is implemented in Griffin, GA. Speak to the county manager about making needed changes in this county that will curb the pet over-population problem. Please continue to rescue from Spalding. It  is still a high kill shelter..
    God Rest the Souls of the Animals that Suffered so Horribly in The Gas Chamber. God Heal the Souls of the Rescuers that Understand and Feel Their Pain. Help us find the strength to fight another day for the animals.

    U.S. Animal Protection has been in negotiations with the county manager and county attorney of Spalding County, Griffn, GA. Animal Shelter to end the gassings of animals.  USAP expressed severe opposition to the gassing of animals and exposed the shelter for cruel killngs.
    Dr.Hopkins (assisted the Congressional review of the Animal Welfare Act revision), Hillarie Allison, Founder of Rescued Unwanted Furry Friends Foundation and I, all members of U.S. Animal Protection, released publicly an immediate cease and desist letter to end gassing at the Spalding County Animal Shelter.
    Dr. Hopkins and I educated the county attorney, the county manager and local sheriff about the inhumanity and cruelty of the gas chamber. I referred the county officials to the  “Euthanasia Manual” by Rebecca Rhodes which proves injection is less expensive and more humane than gassing.
    I made the county officials aware of my intentions and that I would be contacting a regulatory agency. I contacted  the Office of the District Attorney and the GBI regarding the cruelty occurring in the Spalding County shelter as well as other shelters in the state of Georgia. We reminded the office that gassing was now illegal in the state of Georgia.
    Georgia shelters must be exposed for cruel killings. The cruelty must be brought to light before we will see the county officials make the necessary changes from gassing to IV injection.
    While we at USAP oppose the killing of healthy animals, we are realistic and know that killing will continue in Georgia shelters. We must at least see that they will not suffer when they are euthanized. We at USAP will work with county officials to implement a mandatory spay/neuter ordinance in Spalding County, Georgia.
    Cruel killings occur in many shelters throughout the U.S.  Cruelty in animal shelters must be exposed before we will see an end to all shelters that kill by cruel methods.
    USAP members put tremendous pressure on Spalding officials, so much so that county officials agreed to stop gassing animals. On July 1st gassing will end forever at the Spalding Animal Shelter.
    After many years of cruel killings by gas, we have shut down the Spalding chamber forever.
    Dawn Taylor Bechtold
    http://www.USAnimalProtection.org

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    Dear Reagan Bush,
    Thank you for acknowledging USAP and our work to stop the Spalding Gas Chamber.
    We have stopped many shelters from killing cruelly throughout the U.S. This particular shelter is dear to my heart.
    I have rescued from this shelter for years and formed “Spalding Rescue”, a yahoo group formed to rescue animals from this shelter. I learned of this shelter so many years ago when I read reports of puppies and kittens being drowned. This was confirmed by county officials .
    I started my work with this shelter many years ago when the kill rate was 97%. It has dropped down to about 37%.Dawn O’ Brien with The Spay and Neuter Team of Atlanta (SANTA) and myself, as well as other rescuers worked to get animals to safety and have rescued hundreds of animals that would have been gassed to death. We would like to see this shelter eventually become a humane society. We hope to work with the commissioners to see a spay/neuter ordinance implemented. We hope to see this happen immediately. We at USAP have been in discussions with the commissioner regarding the removal of the chamber from the shelter. I have requested the chamber be dismantled, destroyed and removed from the building.
    Again, thank you for your support and concern for the animals of Georgia.
    Dawn Bechtold
    U.S. Animal Protection
    Thank you, USAP, for your hard work over many years in stopping the gassing at Spalding. Dawn Bechtold is tireless in her efforts to stop animal cruelty. There are always so MANY beautiful faces at Spalding –thank you Rescuers for getting dogs out of there!! Rescuers, please keep rescuing!!
    Comment by Mare Horton 
    I hardly know what to say!!!!!!!!!!!! I find it hard to believe in 2009 we are still as barbaric as this!!!!!!!!!! Thank God for people like you that stand up for animal rights and give them a voice!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Comment by Gail 

United States Animal Protection

January 15, 2012

Times Free Press Chattanooga TN

Dawn Bechtold works for Walker shelter changes

by Chloé Morrison

Recommendations for Humane Sheltering Standards

Dawn Bechtold said her love for animals is innate, and she began rescuing animals at age 8.

Now she is the president and founder of a national animal protection group she said has about 1,200 members.

After meeting with Walker Commissioner Bebe Heiskell, Mrs. Bechtold recently worked with the county’s animal shelter to implement improvements at the facility.

Mrs. Bechtold said her organization doesn’t want animals to suffer if they must be euthanized, and it works to change practices at many shelters nationally.

Q: Can you start by talking about what changes you’ve seen at the Walker County Animal Shelter?

A: What I’ve seen is — and I can say I’ve seen because I’ve pulled the open records — they have switched mainly from intraperitoneal injections (into the abdomen) with no sedation, to intravenous injections. That was our main goal.

Q: Who worked on the changes? Did you work with Guy Bilyeu, with the Hamilton County Humane Educational Society?

A: We didn’t work with Guy Bilyeu. We are our own entity. We are United States Animal Protection. It has been Marjorie (Banks, director of USAP) and I, as well as our group members from Animal Shelter reform, which is just part of United States Animal Protection. And it was Bebe Heiskell who agreed to work with United States Animal Protection. We prefer to work with our own organization.

Q: How did the changes occur?

A: Well, once the meeting was held and Bebe agreed to work with us, things just started changing. Mr. (David) Ashburn was more willing to work with us. We wrote something called Humane Shelter Standards and that really explained some of the changes we wanted to see implemented at that shelter. David Ashburn said, ‘Dawn, we have read that and we are following that.’

But … we really hope to see intraperitoneal used only if they must sedate an animal that way. We understand, but we believe there is no reason they shouldn’t at least try to find a vein. If they are going to use intraperitoneal or any type of injection that the animal is weighed. We’d like to see sedation, always.

They did go to a higher dose (of euthanasia solution, which helps animals not suffer).

Q: You mentioned a woman who said she had seen a change in the shelter. What did she say?

A: She says, ‘I haven’t been to Walker in a long time, but when I arrived I couldn’t believe I was in Walker County. First, it smelled like a hospital, and only one half of the shelter was full. Every dog had a card listing its number, info, if it was an owner surrender, and vaccine, deworming info and all the dogs were flea free and all being fed twice a day,’ which is something we asked for.

Q: How does that feel to hear that?

A: We are elated. We are absolutely elated. This is all we’ve been asking for. We are not advocating killing by any means, but if they must die, we ask that they are killed humanely.

Q: How did you get into animal rescue?

A: I’ve always been a rescuer since I was a child. I’ve always brought strays home. The way I became an activist to stop animal cruelty was what I saw when I was 8 years old. I was missing my kitty cat. I was hysterical. I loved my kitty cat. She went everywhere I went. I called my mom at work, and we set out to find her. And I did find her along with about 50 other cats that had been burned, bleached and hung. And I was a child and it was very traumatic for me. I was very angry, and I think it has been instilled in my mind since then.

United States Animal Protection / Harassment from cyberbullies

January 14, 2012

 For an overview of our good work write to USAPSPCA@aol.com.

 

We unfortunately have two cyberstalkers Nancy Green and Leonora Lowery slandering our organization. Please feel free to write us with any questions you may have. USAP funds all rescues and is a private organization.

U.S. Animal Protection Position on Carbon Monoxide

January 12, 2012

CASE AGAINST THE CONTINUED USE OF CARBON MONOXIDE AS AN INHALATIONAL AGENT FOR
EUTHANASIA

Background

Gassing pound animals with carbon monoxide began when the American SPCA took
over the New York City animal control contract in 1895. The use of gas stopped
what was then considered the inhumane practice of drowning strays in the Hudson
River. Carbon monoxide gassing subsequently gained acceptance across the U.S.
and became one of the more commonly used methods of euthanasia in animal control
facilities. However, the method of carbon monoxide gassing, while inexpensive
and effective, was never evaluated as a humane method by veterinarians.
Therefore, the physiological and psychological effects of this method on
individual animals were a matter of speculation.

AVMA Guidelines On Euthanasia

In 1972, at the request of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA)
Council on Research, the Executive Board of the AVMA convened a Panel on
Euthanasia. The task assigned to this Panel was to define euthanasia as it
applies in veterinary medicine; survey any veterinary and scientific literature
on the various methods of euthanasia; and provide guidance on agents and methods
to veterinarians who (presumably) would be performing or directing these
procedures. Included in this mandate was to comment on the possible effects of
each particular method on the physiology and behavior of animals. The Panel was
not directed to obtain was firsthand (practice) knowledge of the individual
methods, or distinguish methods which were more humane than others.
Additionally, the Panel did not distinguish humane methods that could easily be
performed by non-veterinarians in animal control settings. The Panel on
Euthanasia issued its report on March 1, 1972 in the AVMA Journal.

The Panel on Euthanasia was reconvened in 1978, 1986, 1993, 2000 and 2007.
Following the 2007 session, the title of the final document was changed to the
2007 AVMA Guidelines on Euthanasia. While more references were cited,
clarifying language was used and summary tables were provided, the Guidelines
still did not provide a comparative assessment of humane methods that might be
used by non-veterinarians in animal control settings. These Guidelines also
neglected to discuss newer veterinary drugs that facilitated a multiple modality
approach to euthanasia.

When the General Considerations in the AVMA Guidelines are compared with the
discussions on the use of inhalational methods of carbon monoxide for
euthanasia, several glaring dichotomies become evident. Among the 12 General
Considerations, seven do not substantially conform to the letter and intent of
the Guidelines. Specifically, the (1) ability to induce loss of consciousness
and death without causing anxiety, apprehension, distress or pain (2) the time
required to induce loss of consciousness, (3) reliability, (4) safety for
personnel, (7) emotional effect on observers or operators, (10) compatibility
with species, age and health status and (11) ability to maintain equipment in
proper working order are stringent requirements that are difficult to manage and
are highly variable with the inhalational use of carbon monoxide. The following
point-by-point discussion of the problems associated with the General
Considerations is relevant.

Discussion Of AVMA Guidelines

The ability of inhalational agents to be used for euthanasia is considered
humane “if the animal is rapidly exposed to a high concentration of the agent.”
However, the AVMA Guidelines recognize that carbon monoxide is explosive in
concentrations above 10% in air, which also increases the risk of acute toxicity
in humans. Based upon this presumption of hazard, the Guidelines recommend
“commercially prepared gas” at concentration of approximately 6% be used.

The ability of carbon dioxide to cause rapid loss of consciousness without
anxiety, apprehension, distress or pain is questionable based upon the few
scientific studies performed in animals and the anecdotal information from human
exposure. In a carefully controlled study using 6% carbon monoxide in dogs, the
actual time to loss of consciousness could not be determined. But it was
recorded that abnormal brain waves which occurred 20-25 seconds before loss of
consciousness was associated with agitation and vocalization. A subsequent
study by the same investigators demonstrated that the pre-euthanasia
administration of tranquilizers reduced, but did not eliminate agitation and
vocalization. Other scientific studies demonstrate that cats can have tremors
and convulsions prior to loss of consciousness and pigs demonstrate
pre-narcosis agitation and vocalization. An important consideration in
assessing the acute effects of carbon monoxide exposure of animals are the
symptoms reported by humans who recover from carbon monoxide toxicosis. Among
the commonly reported symptoms of “early carbon monoxide toxicosis are headache,
dizziness, and weakness. As concentrations of (carbon monoxide)
carboxyhemoglobin increase, these signs may be followed by decreased visual
acuity, tinnitus, nausea, progressive depression, confusion, and collapse.
Because carbon monoxide stimulates motor centers in the brain, loss of
consciousness may be accompanied by convulsions and muscular spasms.” It is
clear from these descriptions that use of carbon monoxide does not prevent
anxiety, apprehension, or distress, let alone pain (headache, convulsions and
muscle spasms) before narcosis is attained.

While the reliability of carbon monoxide to produce death in animals is not
questioned, the capability to produce humane death is clearly questionable in
the scientific literature and in anecdotal information received from observers
and operators of gassing chambers. Both sources report the clinical signs
described in the discussion above prior to the loss of consciousness among many
species.

Safety of personnel is clearly a problem with carbon monoxide. Above a 10%
concentration, this gas is potentially explosive. The Material Safety Data
Sheet (MSDS) describes this agent as extremely hazardous for personnel because
it is highly toxic and difficult to detect. Acute exposure to concentrations in
concentrations as low as 0.2% of inspired air can produce signs of carbon
monoxide toxicosis. Chronic exposure to very low concentrations of carbon
monoxide as little as 0.05% of inspired air may be a health hazard in
cardiovascular disease and have teratogenic effects. Gas chambers must be
surrounded by an efficient exhaust or ventilation system to prevent accidental
exposure of humans.

There is a high incidence of negative emotional effect on observers and
operators associated with the use of carbon monoxide gas used for euthanasia.
Many operators report that they simply “turn on the gas and walk away,” which
does not fulfill the AVMA Guideline to observe animals until they lose
consciousness and ensure that individual animals are dead (euthanized). The
only study that indicated

The ability to determine the compatibility of carbon monoxide euthanasia with
animal species, different ages of animals and the health status of individual
animal requires knowledge of taxonomy, neonatology and some ability to perform a
clinical evaluation of individual animals. Carbon monoxide is contraindicated
in reptiles, amphibians, diving birds and mammals that have a great capacity for
holding their breath and/or living with anaerobic metabolism. Use of carbon
monoxide in neonatal animals less than 16 weeks of age is contraindicated
because of residual fetal hemoglobin in their blood. And lastly, animals with
impaired respiratory function may not be able to assimilate carbon monoxide
rapidly through respiration.

A carbon monoxide chamber requires a special site, ventilation and construction.
Operation requires thorough maintenance, strict operating procedures and a
stringent requirement for training operators on maintenance, procedures and
hazards. These requirements under the AVMA Guidelines impose difficult and in
some circumstances conflicting limitations on reliably performing humane
euthanasia with carbon monoxide. The AVMA Guidelines state the chamber should
(preferably) be located outside, must constructed from the highest quality
materials, must be cleanable and should allow for separation of individual
animals. If a chamber is located inside a building, there is a requirement for
a carbon monoxide monitoring system. A not well understood feature of these
chambers is that they have to be safely vented to the outside in a manner that
allows displacement of air inside the chamber with the carbon monoxide gas.
They cannot be air tight to function properly. The Guidelines also require a
chamber to be well lit and have view a port to allow the direct observation of
animals. All lights and mechanical apparatus must be explosion proof because
of the combustibility of carbon monoxide. Operation procedures require thorough
cleaning between uses to minimize odors (pheromones) that would cause anxiety,
apprehension and distress in animals subsequently euthanatized. Loading of the
chamber permits only animals of the same species in a manner that precludes
overcrowding. In introducing the carbon monoxide gas into the chamber, the flow
rate should be adequate to rapidly achieve a uniform concentration of at least
6% carbon monoxide inside the chamber, but should be so rapid as to produce
noise that causes agitation. And finally, all personnel using carbon monoxide
chambers must be instructed thoroughly on all the above Guidelines and must
understand the hazards and limitations. It is also mandatory that carbon
dioxide be used in compliance with all Federal (NIOSH/OSHA, EPA) and state
regulations. Based upon the above considerations, the operation of a carbon
monoxide chamber to cause humane euthanasia by anyone other than a veterinarian
who could judge a malfunction of the apparatus, or an untoward physiological or
behavior problem with an individual animal, is not reasonable.

United States Animal Protection
Dr. Robert Hopkins Dawn Taylor Bechtold

United States Animal Protection Case Against Use of Carbon Monoxide

January 12, 2012

 

CASE AGAINST THE CONTINUED USE OF CARBON MONOXIDE AS AN INHALATIONAL AGENT FOR EUTHANASIA Background Gassing pound animals with carbon monoxide began when the American SPCA took over the New York City animal control contract in 1895. The use of gas stopped what was then considered the inhumane practice of drowning strays in the Hudson River. Carbon monoxide gassing subsequently gained acceptance across the U.S. and became one of the more commonly used methods of euthanasia in animal control facilities. However, the method of carbon monoxide gassing, while inexpensive and effective, was never evaluated as a humane method by veterinarians. Therefore, the physiological and psychological effects of this method on individual animals were a matter of speculation. AVMA Guidelines On Euthanasia In 1972, at the request of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Council on Research, the Executive Board of the AVMA convened a Panel on Euthanasia. The task assigned to this Panel was to define euthanasia as it applies in veterinary medicine; survey any veterinary and scientific literature on the various methods of euthanasia; and provide guidance on agents and methods to veterinarians who (presumably) would be performing or directing these procedures. Included in this mandate was to comment on the possible effects of each particular method on the physiology and behavior of animals. The Panel was not directed to obtain was firsthand (practice) knowledge of the individual methods, or distinguish methods which were more humane than others. Additionally, the Panel did not distinguish humane methods that could easily be performed by non-veterinarians in animal control settings. The Panel on Euthanasia issued its report on March 1, 1972 in the AVMA Journal. The Panel on Euthanasia was reconvened in 1978, 1986, 1993, 2000 and 2007. Following the 2007 session, the title of the final document was changed to the 2007 AVMA Guidelines on Euthanasia. While more references were cited, clarifying language was used and summary tables were provided, the Guidelines still did not provide a comparative assessment of humane methods that might be used by non-veterinarians in animal control settings. These Guidelines also neglected to discuss newer veterinary drugs that facilitated a multiple modality approach to euthanasia. When the General Considerations in the AVMA Guidelines are compared with the discussions on the use of inhalational methods of carbon monoxide for euthanasia, several glaring dichotomies become evident. Among the 12 General Considerations, seven do not substantially conform to the letter and intent of the Guidelines. Specifically, the (1) ability to induce loss of consciousness and death without causing anxiety, apprehension, distress or pain (2) the time required to induce loss of consciousness, (3) reliability, (4) safety for personnel, (7) emotional effect on observers or operators, (10) compatibility with species, age and health status and (11) ability to maintain equipment in proper working order are stringent requirements that are difficult to manage and are highly variable with the inhalational use of carbon monoxide. The following point-by-point discussion of the problems associated with the General Considerations is relevant. Discussion Of AVMA Guidelines The ability of inhalational agents to be used for euthanasia is considered humane “if the animal is rapidly exposed to a high concentration of the agent.” However, the AVMA Guidelines recognize that carbon monoxide is explosive in concentrations above 10% in air, which also increases the risk of acute toxicity in humans. Based upon this presumption of hazard, the Guidelines recommend “commercially prepared gas” at concentration of approximately 6% be used. The ability of carbon dioxide to cause rapid loss of consciousness without anxiety, apprehension, distress or pain is questionable based upon the few scientific studies performed in animals and the anecdotal information from human exposure. In a carefully controlled study using 6% carbon monoxide in dogs, the actual time to loss of consciousness could not be determined. But it was recorded that abnormal brain waves which occurred 20-25 seconds before loss of consciousness was associated with agitation and vocalization. A subsequent study by the same investigators demonstrated that the pre-euthanasia administration of tranquilizers reduced, but did not eliminate agitation and vocalization. Other scientific studies demonstrate that cats can have tremors and convulsions prior to loss of consciousness and pigs demonstrate pre-narcosis agitation and vocalization. An important consideration in assessing the acute effects of carbon monoxide exposure of animals are the symptoms reported by humans who recover from carbon monoxide toxicosis. Among the commonly reported symptoms of “early carbon monoxide toxicosis are headache, dizziness, and weakness. As concentrations of (carbon monoxide) carboxyhemoglobin increase, these signs may be followed by decreased visual acuity, tinnitus, nausea, progressive depression, confusion, and collapse. Because carbon monoxide stimulates motor centers in the brain, loss of consciousness may be accompanied by convulsions and muscular spasms.” It is clear from these descriptions that use of carbon monoxide does not prevent anxiety, apprehension, or distress, let alone pain (headache, convulsions and muscle spasms) before narcosis is attained. While the reliability of carbon monoxide to produce death in animals is not questioned, the capability to produce humane death is clearly questionable in the scientific literature and in anecdotal information received from observers and operators of gassing chambers. Both sources report the clinical signs described in the discussion above prior to the loss of consciousness among many species. Safety of personnel is clearly a problem with carbon monoxide. Above a 10% concentration, this gas is potentially explosive. The Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) describes this agent as extremely hazardous for personnel because it is highly toxic and difficult to detect. Acute exposure to concentrations in concentrations as low as 0.2% of inspired air can produce signs of carbon monoxide toxicosis. Chronic exposure to very low concentrations of carbon monoxide as little as 0.05% of inspired air may be a health hazard in cardiovascular disease and have teratogenic effects. Gas chambers must be surrounded by an efficient exhaust or ventilation system to prevent accidental exposure of humans. There is a high incidence of negative emotional effect on observers and operators associated with the use of carbon monoxide gas used for euthanasia. Many operators report that they simply “turn on the gas and walk away,” which does not fulfill the AVMA Guideline to observe animals until they lose consciousness and ensure that individual animals are dead (euthanized). The only study that indicated The ability to determine the compatibility of carbon monoxide euthanasia with animal species, different ages of animals and the health status of individual animal requires knowledge of taxonomy, neonatology and some ability to perform a clinical evaluation of individual animals. Carbon monoxide is contraindicated in reptiles, amphibians, diving birds and mammals that have a great capacity for holding their breath and/or living with anaerobic metabolism. Use of carbon monoxide in neonatal animals less than 16 weeks of age is contraindicated because of residual fetal hemoglobin in their blood. And lastly, animals with impaired respiratory function may not be able to assimilate carbon monoxide rapidly through respiration. A carbon monoxide chamber requires a special site, ventilation and construction. Operation requires thorough maintenance, strict operating procedures and a stringent requirement for training operators on maintenance, procedures and hazards. These requirements under the AVMA Guidelines impose difficult and in some circumstances conflicting limitations on reliably performing humane euthanasia with carbon monoxide. The AVMA Guidelines state the chamber should (preferably) be located outside, must constructed from the highest quality materials, must be cleanable and should allow for separation of individual animals. If a chamber is located inside a building, there is a requirement for a carbon monoxide monitoring system. A not well understood feature of these chambers is that they have to be safely vented to the outside in a manner that allows displacement of air inside the chamber with the carbon monoxide gas. They cannot be air tight to function properly. The Guidelines also require a chamber to be well lit and have view a port to allow the direct observation of animals. All lights and mechanical apparatus must be explosion proof because of the combustibility of carbon monoxide. Operation procedures require thorough cleaning between uses to minimize odors (pheromones) that would cause anxiety, apprehension and distress in animals subsequently euthanatized. Loading of the chamber permits only animals of the same species in a manner that precludes overcrowding. In introducing the carbon monoxide gas into the chamber, the flow rate should be adequate to rapidly achieve a uniform concentration of at least 6% carbon monoxide inside the chamber, but should be so rapid as to produce noise that causes agitation. And finally, all personnel using carbon monoxide chambers must be instructed thoroughly on all the above Guidelines and must understand the hazards and limitations. It is also mandatory that carbon dioxide be used in compliance with all Federal (NIOSH/OSHA, EPA) and state regulations. Based upon the above considerations, the operation of a carbon monoxide chamber to cause humane euthanasia by anyone other than a veterinarian who could judge a malfunction of the apparatus, or an untoward physiological or behavior problem with an individual animal, is not reasonable. United States Animal Protection Dr. Robert Hopkins Dawn Taylor Bechtold

Hello world!

April 6, 2010

SOURCE: Robert’s Cause

http://www.robertscause.org/  
 

Mar 18, 2010 09:00 ET

Robert’s Cause Meets With North Carolina’s Governor’s Office to Address Complaints About Inhumane Treatment at Animal Shelter

NEW YORK, NY–(Marketwire – March 18, 2010) –  Responding to an outpouring of reports regarding inhumane euthanasia practices at the Robeson County, North Carolina animal shelter, Robert’s Cause met on Monday, March 15th, with officials at the State Capitol in Raleigh.

In its role as a coordinating and facilitating animal advocacy organization, Robert Misseri and Bruce Feinberg in conjunction with the U.S. Animal Protection in a meeting chaired by Will Polk, Deputy General Counsel to NC Governor Bev Perdue, that was attended by representatives of the North Carolina Attorney General’s Office, and the Veterinary Division of the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Participating in the meeting via teleconference was USAP President Dawn Taylor Bechtold and Dr. Robert Hopkins, Director U.S. Animal Protection.

“We are grateful to Governor Perdue for the opportunity to meet in order to open lines of communication in an effort to address the allegations of ongoing animal cruelty and to formulate action plans to foster animal welfare throughout the state,” said Robert Misseri.

In addition to the Robeson County allegations (the subject of an active investigation by the State), the cessation of euthanasia by gassing at the remaining North Carolina shelters still utilizing this practice, expanded animal welfare educational programs, spay and neutering initiatives, and increased community involvement were also among the topics discussed.

“Having now visited the Robeson County Shelter and began a dialogue with State officials, I feel we can make substantial progress working in concert with the State towards the welfare and humane treatment of animals through North Carolina. We feel confident that by working together in a transparent process we can realize significant improvements on behalf of the animals,” said Misseri.

Robert’s Cause can be found on the Internet at www.robertscause.org, and on Facebook as the group Robert’s Cause. U.S. Animal Protection’s website can be viewed at http://www.usanimalprotection.org.

Contact:
Tactical Public Relations
info@tacticalpr.com

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